SampleSample Lesson plans for grades K-2.

Introduction to Music Unit for grades K-2 on "Viennese Music Clock" from the Háry János Suite by Zoltán Kodály
written by Dr. Kay Edwards, Miami University
Unit Length
There are 3 lessons in this unit for grades K-2. Lesson plans are designed for class periods of approximately 30-40 minutes. Teachers will need to adapt the lesson plans to fit their school resources and the individual needs of their students.
Lesson Use
These 3 lessons are designed for use by general music teachers. However, portions of the lessons could be used by classroom teachers as well.
Standards
National Standards for Music are indicated on each lesson. The 3 lessons combined address 5 out of the 9 National Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6.
The Ohio Standards for Music are indicated on each lesson also. Music teachers in other states can easily match their standards to those in this unit. The 3 lessons combined address 3 out of the 5 Ohio Content Standards.
Multiple Intelligences
These lessons facilitate musical and bodily-kinesthetic intelligence, 2 of the 7 intelligences originally identified by Howard Gardner.
Overview
Music Concepts and Objectives/Outcomes are indicated on each lesson. Over the 3 lessons, the Concept Areas of Rhythm, Melody, Form, and Harmony are used. Skills developed over the 3 lessons are Singing, Moving, Listening, Playing Instruments, and Creating.
Lesson #1: Move to the Beat Lesson #2: Sol–Mi–La Lesson #3: Bordun (Drone Accompaniment)
Prior Knowledge
No prior knowledge on the part of the student is needed, although it is helpful to have had experience keeping a steady beat, moving arms to indicate Sol-Mi, or playing a mallet instrument.
Materials and Equipment
Each lesson indicates the required materials and equipment. Whenever playing a recording, it is important to have a high-quality sound system and use a high-quality recording. The Classics for Kids CD or website can be very helpful in this regard!
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Instructional Plans (Lesson Plans)
Each lesson plan has been designed specifically for the grade K-2 age group, although music teachers may have to adapt portions of each plan. The plans have been "teacher-tested" and are easy-to-follow, set up in a format similar to many music series textbooks. Step-by-step guidelines are given under the "Sequence" portion of each lesson.
Supplementary Materials
Some lessons include a listening map. By clicking on the highlighted, underlined link at that point of the lesson plan you can read the handout with Adobe Acrobat Reader and print it out for use in your classroom. You may wish to make an overhead transparency in addition to student copies.
Assessment/Evaluation
Assessment strategies are included with each lesson. For grades K-2, simple rubrics tied to the specific objective/outcome of each lesson are sometimes included. Teachers may find it helpful to collect assessment on individual students over longer periods of time, assessing perhaps 8 students during each class, or whatever is practical to maximize instructional time for children to be actively involved.
Extensions
Each lesson includes strategies for extending the lesson either that same day or on a separate day. Teachers may devise their own lesson extensions as they take advantage of "the teachable moments" that occur in their classrooms!

1. RHYTHM (Steady Beat); FORM (Same or Different) MOVING, LISTENING

• Analyzing and responding. (Demonstrate/identify contrasting elements of music.) • Historical, Cultural and Social Contexts. (Sing, listen, and move to music from various historical periods.)
Multiple Intelligences: Musical, Bodily-Kinesthetic
Concept: Music can have a steady beat. Music can have sections that are the same or different from one another; we can use the same movement for sections that are the same.
Objective/Outcome: Students will use body motions to the beat, using the same motion for each "A" section as they listen to recorded music.
Materials:
• recording of “Viennese Musical Clock" from the Háry János Suite by Zoltán Kodály (available on the Classics for Kids CD or the Classics for Kids website) • tapping page for section A of "Viennese Musical Clock" for K–2
“Tick-tock/Cuckoo” song (for Extension)
Sequence: 1. Begin by stating that you have some special music to play for the class today. The music is about a certain object...can they guess what it is? Give clues to lead them to guess what the object is (a clock). 2. Ask questions such as, "What do we depend on clocks to do?" (keep good time). If possible, bring a wind-up clock so that the steady ticking can be heard. 3. Invite the children to listen for the steady beat of the music, similar to the steady ticking of a clock. 4. "Do what I do." As you play the recording, make the same motion that the children will follow each time they hear the "A" section. Choose a motion done with both hands on both sides of the body, such as gently tapping your shoulders. Choose contrasting motions for each different section, such as tapping your head for the "B" section, tapping your waist for section C, and gently tapping your ears for D. (Note to teacher: Some "A" sections use different instrumentation. The overall form is: Introduction–A–B–A–C–A–D–A–Coda.)
Times for each section using Classics for Kids CD or website; may vary slightly
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grades K–2on different recordings.
Introduction: 0:01-08 A0:09-24 B0:24-38 A0:38-53 C0:53-1:11 A1:11-1:26 D1:26-1:41 A1:41-1:55 Coda:1:55-2:03
5. Repeat, using children's ideas for A, B, and C; everyone can make up their own motion for D and a "big ending" for the Coda. See if the class can do motions without your help as you assess (see below). 6. Use locomotor movement for each A section to emphasize the beat and form. Form a large circle like a "clock face" and walk clockwise for each A section; stand in place facing in to the center and do a different motion for each different section.
7. Tell the class that this piece is entitled “Viennese Musical Clock.” (Have them repeat the title.) 8. Display the tapping page for section A that features 8 clocks in a row and demonstrate how to tap on each clock with the beat of the music. Have children tap on their own copy of the tapping page or, they could tap in the air while looking at the copy on the overhead projector. Tap on body parts while sitting for B, C, and D (for instance, tap head for B, ears for C, and shoulders for D). See if the class can use the tapping page for each "A" section without your help as you assess (see below).
Closure/Questions: What part of music did we move to today? (the steady beat) Why did we move the same way for some sections of the music? (because they were the same, or nearly the same) Review the concepts stated above in this lesson plan. Can you remember the title of the piece of music?
Assessment/Evaluation: Check for beat competency and identification/demonstration of same and different sections. You may wish to use a rubric such as __ (student's name) can do "all or most of the time," "some of the time," or "not yet." You may wish to videotape the lesson and review it later for this purpose.
Extensions: 1. Insmallgroups,havechildrencreateawaytoshowthebeatoftheASection while the teacher leads motions for B, C, and D (second grade). 2. Singasongaboutaclocksuchas“Tick-tock/Cuckoo,”orlistentoanother recording that features a clock such as "The Syncopated Clock" by Leroy Anderson or Symphony No. 101 “Clock Symphony” by Haydn.
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2. MELODY/PITCH (Sol-Mi-La) SINGING, CREATING

grades K–2
Lesson Plan #2: So(l)*-Mi-La
*Note: Some teachers prefer to use "So" instead of "Sol" for the open vowel.
National Std. #1:
National Std. #3: National Std. #4:
• Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music. • Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments. • Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines. (If Lesson Extension #3 is used.)
Ohio Standards: repertoire; use head voice; improvise and compose simple melodic phrases.) (Read, write, and perform Sol-Mi-La melodies on treble staff – if Lesson Extension #3 is used.)
Multiple Intelligences: Musical, Bodily-Kinesthetic Concept: Music can have a melody consisting of only two pitches, or only three
pitches.
Objective/Outcome: Students will use Curwen hand signs for Sol, Mi, and La while singing and will create their own improvised melodies using these pitches (and notate their melodies on treble staff if Extension #3 of this lesson is used).
Materials:
• recording of “Viennese Musical Clock” from the Háry János Suite by Zoltán Kodály (available on the Classics for Kids CD or the Classics for Kids website) • Curwen hand sign chart
“Tick-tock/Cuckoo” (traditional song) • "One, Two, Tie My Shoe" (traditional song) • "Rain, Rain, Go Away" (traditional song) • "Hickory Dickory Dock" (traditional poem) • 11X14 paper and construction paper ovals (optional)
• Creative Expression and Communication. (Sing a varied
Sequence: 1. Give instruction: "Be my echo." Sing "Yoo-hoo" as a descending minor third beginning on various pitches (G-E, C-A, etc.). 2. Ask students how may different pitches there were. (2) Which one was higher, "Yoo" or "hoo"? ("Yoo) 3. Tell students that we can show that one pitch is higher and one is lower by using our bodies. Are the two sounds very far apart? (No.) Then our movements will need to be fairly close together, too.
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4. "Do what I do." Show the students that can use their bodies to show the higher note by touching their shoulders ( for "Yoo") and the lower note by touching their waist (for "hoo"). [Or, if you prefer, use chest and hips.] 5. Have the class follow you as you improvise a Sol-Mi song. Instead of "Yoo- hoo," you can use "Tick-tock" to correlate with a lesson using "Viennese Musical Clock" by Zoltán Kodály.
6. Teach the song “Tick-tock/Cuckoo” by rote using shoulders-waist for the So- Mi pitches. You may also wish to have children sing "Sol-Mi," or to review these pitches. 7. Allow volunteers to lead the class in improvised Sol-Mi songs using "Tick- Tock,” "Yoo-hoo," or "Sol-Mi."
8. Sing a familiar song such as "One, Two, Tie My Shoe," beginning on shoulders and moving to the waist to fit the melody.
9. Show the Curwen hand signs for Sol and Mi.
Explain that with "Sol," it is like you are looking at the wall of your "house" and that "Mi" is like the floor.
10. Add the solfege syllable "la," holding your hand above "sol". For touching the body, students can touch their head if you are using shoulders
for "sol" and waist for "mi." You might use the shoulders for "la" if you are using check for "sol" and hips for "mi." 11. Improvise Sol-Mi-La songs using solfege or "tick-tock-tack" to correlate to Kodály's "Viennese Musical Clock." Invite the children to lead the class in improvised songs (or, for a whole-body movement break, play recording of the “Viennese Musical Clock” and move to the beat of the music.)
12. Sing a familiar Sol-Mi-La song such as "Rain, Rain, Go Away" using the Curwen hand signs. 13. Review the poem "Hickory Dickory Dock," then turn a poem into a song by using Sol-Mi-La with the words of the poem. This poem involves a clock, again correlating to the "Viennese Musical Clock."
Hickory dickory dock, The mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck one, the mouse ran down, Hickory dickory dock.
Closure/Questions: How many pitches did we use today? (2, 3) How did we show the way the melody went back and forth between the two pitches, or the three pitches? (body movements, hand signs) What special syllables do we use for these pitches? (Sol-Mi-La, or our "tick-tock-tack" syllables today)
Assessment/Evaluation: Check for understanding and demonstration of body movements/hand signs. Listen for pitch accuracy. Take notes regarding those students who volunteered to lead songs and whether they performed with accuracy. You may wish to use "all or most of the time," "some of the time," and
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"not yet" as rubrics.
Extensions: 1. Addresonatorbells(tonebells)forSol-Mi,andSol-Mi-LausingG,E,andAor other tonal centers. Use these syllables to turn more poems into songs (such as "Jack Be Nimble" or others). 2. Use puppets to have sung conversations with children in the class. 3. National Std. #4: Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines. For first or second grade, write a 2- or 3-line staff on 11x14 paper; use checkers, felt ovals, or construction paper ovals for notes to create Sol-Mi-La songs (on 2 adjacent lines with the space above or on 2 adjacent spaces with the line above). Provide a "Sol-Mi-La Composition Set" for each child. Sing the compositions.
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3. HARMONY (Bordun), RHYTHM PLAYING

grades K–2
Lesson Plan #3: Bordun (Drone Accompaniment)
National Std. #2:• Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music. National Std. #3:• Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments.
Ohio Standards:• Creative Expression and Communication. (Play a variety of classroom instruments with proper technique; improvise simple rhythmic phrases.)
Multiple Intelligences: Musical, Bodily-Kinesthetic Concept: Music can have an accompaniment.
Objective/Outcome: Students will play a bordun (open fifth "drone") as an accompaniment, first using a steady beat, then improvising rhythmically.
Materials:
• recording of "Viennese Musical Clock" from the Háry János Suite by Zoltán Kodály (available on the Classics for Kids CD or the Classics for Kids website) • sets of resonator bells (tone bells) and/or chromatic bells for Eb and Bb [if using chromatic bells, place “stickies” on these two bars], 2 soft rubber mallets each
“Tick-tock/Cuckoo” song (for Extension) • “One, Two, Tie My Shoe” song (for Extension) • “Rain, Rain, Go Away” song (for Extension)
Sequence: 1. Tell students that today is special because they will get to play instruments later in the lesson. 2. Listen to the recording of "Viennese Musical Clock" and pat the beat gently on your thighs with both hands simultaneously. Invite students to join in, doing so softly in order to hear the music. 3. Form lines behind each set of Eb-Bb bells that you have, with one set of mallets each. Review correct mallet technique (thumb and index fingers hold mallets with other fingers wrapped around; hands as if on handlebars of a bike, wrists loose, bounce off of bars); practice this in the air. 4. Show the students how to play the two bars simultaneously. 5. Play the recording of "Viennese Musical Clock" by Zoltán Kodály and have each student sitting in the front of the line play the bordun during the "A" section of the music. After each "A" section, the Player hands the mallets to the person sitting behind and then goes to the end of the line. The new Player gets ready to
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play when the "A" section returns. [Note to teacher: The complete form is Introduction–A–B–A–C–A–D–A–Coda; the last return of the A section (1:41-1:55) changes key in the middle of the section, so you will need to have the bordun players stop at the key change.]
Times for each section using Classics for Kids CD or website; may vary slightly with different recordings: Introduction: 0:01-08 A0:09-24
B0:24-38 A0:38-53 C0:53-1:11 A1:11-1:26 D1:26-1:41 A1:41-1:55 Coda:1:55-2:03
6. Students who are waiting in line for their turn can lightly pat the beat on their laps for "A." Everyone pats a different body part (head, ears, etc.) for each new section of the music, led by the teacher. 7. If you wish, a separate group of students to move to the music can be formed. Movers and Players can switch places for a repeated hearing. Invite Movers to create a "clock movement/dance" of some kind for the "A" section each time it returns.
8. For an additional hearing (or sooner if needed), invite students to improvise rhythmically on the bordun during the "A" section. Provide an example of something that "goes with the music." 9. Take turns improvising on the bells.
Closure/Questions: How many bells did we play to go along with the music today? (2) [Introduce term "accompaniment" if you wish.] How did we play the bells at first? (with a steady beat) Then what did we do? (make up the rhythm) Have the class evaluate whether the movement that the Movers created went well with the music.
Assessment/Evaluation: Check for understanding and demonstration of steady beat and proper instrument technique, noting whether individual students were able to do so successfully “all/most of the time,” “some of the time,” or “not yet”.
Extensions: Use the resonator bells to accompany songs from a previous lesson, such as “Tick-tock/Cuckoo,” "One, Two, Tie My Shoe," or "Rain, Rain, Go Away" with a C & G, D & A, E & B, or F & C bordun.